The Police And Criminal Evidence Act 1984

The Police And Criminal Evidence Act 1984

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The Police And Criminal Evidence Act 1984

 

The Police and Criminal Evidence Act 1984 was an act passed within the United Kingdom which was designed to help define the rules regarding evidence and the powers of law enforcement officers in the UK. The Police and Criminal Evidence Act 1984, or PACE as it is sometimes known, sets out the powers of police with regard to a number of different situations, include the powers of the police with regard to situations in which they are conducting a search without having first made an arrest, the powers of the police with regard to situations in which they interviewing individuals at the police station, and the responsibilities of the police with regards to keeping individuals in detention at a police station or otherwise in police custody. If you find your rights violated, consult with a criminal lawyer.

As the Police and Criminal Evidence Act 1984 is designed to keep police powers in balance with the powers and rights afforded to the public, it is very much concerned with how evidence can be obtained by the police, as evidence which is obtained through an unlawful exercise of power from the police according to the Police and Criminal Evidence Act 1984 would thus be disallowed from trial.

The Police and Criminal Evidence Act 1984 is still being modified in the United Kingdom, as new cases come up which imply that it should be altered for the better. Codes have been added to the Police and Criminal Evidence Act 1984 which provide for detention of suspected terrorists, and case law regarding issues of the Police and Criminal Evidence Act 1984 has led to further refinements of the act.  

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