The Innocent Verdict

The Innocent Verdict

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The Innocent Verdict
When it comes it comes to criminal trials there are often two parties present. There is the plaintiff, who can often be backed by law enforcement and then there is the defendant side; this is the side where the accused individual or people are found.
 
 
In the United States, one of the most common phrases used regarding criminal law is “innocent until proven guilty”; what this means is that before and while an individual is on trial, they are still considered to be innocent; the statements made against these individuals are allegations, and not yet deemed factual.
 
 
When court is in session both the prosecutor and the attorney will take turns questioning witnesses, the accused, and whoever they deem necessary in order to prove their cases. At this point the defendant is presumed innocent by the court of law, and it is the job of the prosecution to use the evidence that they have against the individual in order to prove guilt. Innocence is one of the rights the United States has guaranteed to the citizens, until a trial by jury is conducted.
 
 
Once a trial has been followed through in its entirety, the jury makes the decided vote regarding the innocence of the accused. If the jury finds insufficient evidence has been presented against the defendant, they can vote for a verdict of not guilty. Once the verdict has been handed out, the defendant can remain presumed innocent, and be released from the court, regarding the charges he or she had been affixed with.

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